Mapa de Cuba

Information about Cuba

Advisory: Legal aspectAdvisory: All the personal information that you bring us will be only for subjects of your reservation in Cuba, we will never send an email like SPAM, only those with answers for questions you ask us and your mail address as well as any other information who offer us will maintain strictly confidential. Your email address, personal data and any other data provided by you, never will not be provided third persons, nor to other organizations, groups or companies.

Advisory: Travels to Cuba for US citizens may be eligible under the "General License", which is a do it yourself authorization, no further application is required.

This web is the largest and friendly place to guarantee unforgettable holidays in Cuba. No reservation fees, no online payments. The payment will be done once you arrive your destination, directly to the people that will give you the services. Lots of tourists go on a package deal to areas such as Varadero, Jardines del Rey (Cayo Coco, Cayo Guillermo) or Holguin and stay in an all inclusive hotel resort. My best advice to you is to travel around the country, stay in Casas Particulares, where you will be a guest in a Cuban family's home. Hire a car or take the Viazul Bus, whatever, Cuba is easy to do on your own and much cheaper when you arrange it yourself, trust me. Have dinner in the casas, talk to the Cuban people, mingle with the locals and feel ... La Vida Cubana [Cuban Life].

Money

Money provokes a certain sense of confusion in Cuba as the dual-economy takes some getting used to. Two currencies circulate in Cuba: convertible pesos (CUC$) and Cuban pesos (referred to as moneda nacional, abbreviated MN). The currency situation is made more confusing since Cubans will refer to both CUCs and Moneda Nacional as Pesos. For the average Cuban it will be obvious which they are referring to, but this may lead to confusion for tourists who consider that they are bargaining in local currency only to find that their counter-party expects payment in CUCs! For most tourists moneda nacional has little relevance since most, if not all of their expenditure will be in CUCs. This includes accommodation, food in most restaurants, taxis, bus tickets, nightclub entrances, tips and so on. Things, which can be paid for in local currency, include fruit and vegetables at the agricultural market, street food (such as pizza and peanuts) as well as local buses. Even at the agricultural market the prices are such that a pound of tomatoes may cost CUC 1 or 24 Cuban Pesos (i.e. the same). There are some restaurants and bars/cafes, which charge in Cuban Pesos although the quality is generally poor.

Currency

Try and avoid US dollars since you will be subject to a 10% special additional tax/commission. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars, or Sterling since these are the most common and the exchange rates are generally quire reasonable. Bear in mind that the CUC is pegged to the US Dollar (at 1:1) so a stronger US Dollar means a stronger CUC (and hence less CUCs for your Euros/Sterling etc.). Other currencies, which are universally accepted at banks or Cadecas, include the Swiss Francs (CHF), Mexican Pesos (MXN) and Japanese Yen (JPY). There is no outright commission charged on transactions in cash although the exchange rate will generally be 3% worse than you would be charged on your credit card (for which you pay a 3% processing fee) so net you receive the same CUCs for changing 100 Euros in cash or 100 Euros on your credit card.

Exchanging Currency

The easiest place to change money is at a CADECA (change bureau) or at a Cuban *BFI Bank. The exchange rates in all CADECAS and all banks are identical so there is no need to shop around. Hotels often have CADECAS within their premises. If you change money at the hotel front desk you will generally receive a worse exchange rate then elsewhere. Note: It is generally very easy to find the nearest CADECA and you should be aware that any Cuban who tries to persuade you that it is complicated or that he can provide you a better rate of exchange will probably be engaged in some sort of scam which is best avoided. * There are 4 main banks in Cuba. BFI is the most reliable. You may be able to use other Cubans banks but these are less likely to be able to meet your needs since most operate mainly in Cuban Pesos. Always bring new bank notes, with no rips, tears or markings. All foreign coins are useless. Make sure that you get a printed receipt when changing money.

Credit Cards

Cash is king in Cuba. Except in major hotels you should not count on paying for goods or services with a credit card anywhere in Cuba.

Clothes

Cuba is a sub-tropical country so pack for summer. Bikinis, shorts, sandals, short-sleeved cotton dresses and shirts are the order of the day. But, bear in mind that Cuban men would never wear shorts in the City! A night out at Tropicana or La Guarida restaurant needs something smart if not overly formal. If you are coming in the winter don't assume that it will be hot all the time, especially in the evenings. Bring some warm clothing (long sleeves, a sweater or fleece), since there is nothing more frustrating then being frozen to death in a tropical country! Lightweight rain gear is suggested if you are coming in the summer.

Books & magazines

There are basically no magazines or books available in Cuba (excepting some Latin American literature.) Bring reading material or load up the Kindle/IPad. It can be a nice gesture to leave behind some gossip magazines for Cubans you meet along the way.

Medical kit

As in many countries a fully stocked medical kit should be packed as part of your travel luggage. This should include Anti diarrhea (Imodium) some form of antacid (Rolaids or Tums) for stomach problems. The Cuban health care system works pretty well but there is no harm in bringing more than you absolutely may need.

Electricity

Generally Cuban electricity is 110V with the square American plug socket. Into the hostels the electricity is 110v & 220v. Some hotels have predominantly 220V and round sockets.

Havana

Havana is probably the most splendid example of Spanish colonial architecture in Latin America. Much of the historic centre has been carefully restored. The absence of the outward manifestations of international commerce - advertising billboards, burger chains, neon lights - helps create a subtle and haunting atmosphere missing in the other capitals of the Spanish colonial domain. Museums, forts and lively squares add to the attraction.

Viñales

Around Viñales, in the western province of Pinar del Rio, are a unique string of rounded limestone mountains called mogotes; in their shadows are the lush green fields that produce the world's finest tobacco leaves, the dream of cigar connoisseurs from Paris to New York.

Trinidad

Trinidad is a small and peaceful city located between the sea and a range of rolling verdant hills. It pays homage to an illustrious past by remaining perfectly preserved since colonial times. There are fine churches and red-tiled mansions lining the cobbled streets, many of which are open to visitors. To savour the richness of this culture, visit the half-dozen museums or music clubs (casas de la trova), or a cigar factory whilst staying at nearby Playa Ancón.

Varadero

The resort of Varadero, some 32 km NE of Matanzas, is the closest you'll get to finding Miami Beach in Cuba. If you are looking for a straightforward beach holiday in a good modern hotel with cable TV, air-conditioning, a pool and a jacuzzi, then this is the place for you although the best options is a particular house, we offers severals. The seas are warm and crystal blue - and it is one of the few places in Cuba where women can sunbathe topless.

Cienfuegos

Cienfuegos City is called "The Pearl of the South" because of the impressive beauty of its bay; because of its seductive city which provokes the wonder of all who know it, and because of that innate nobility which characterizes those born in Cienfuegos. The history of Cienfuegos possesses interesting antecedents and is rich in aborigine and Hispanic legends. Before the Spanish came to America, the zone was settled by indigenous people and was known as the Cacicazgo de Jagua.

Santiago de Cuba

Nestled alongside a sweeping bay at the foothills of the Sierra Maestra mountains, Santiago is Cuba's most exotic and ethnically diverse city. Santiago is renowned for producing much of Cuba's most important music, and this rich musical tradition, mingled with the remnants of French customs, gives the city a sensual, even sleazy, New Orleans-like atmosphere.

Baracoa

Baracoa is a land of great rainfall and many rivers. The lush vegetation, the high mountains covered with long-lived forest, the customs that have been handed down from one generation to another and the appearance of a town that has remained unchanged over a long time are, undoubtly, key ingredients in the special attraction of this tiny city on the shores of Miel (Honey) Bay.

Beaches

Cuban beaches are sparkling and unlittered - hotels are not luxurious but seldom blot the shoreline. The bright turquoise waters of the Caribbean, often fringed with palm groves, do not disappoint. The visitor can choose between the isolated and unstructured charms of Las Brujas and the island of Cayo Levisa, or a more sophisticated resort such as Playa Ancon, close to Trinidad or the beaches of the south of Matanzas, Bay of Pigs.

Rural cuba

Alongside the plantations of tobacco, sugar cane or pineapples, rural Cuba - with its tranquil, bucolic lifestyle - rewards the visitor with some gorgeous mountain scenery. Close to Viñales in the west is a dramatic landscape of sheer limestone monoliths, fertile valleys and underground waterways. The historically significant Sierra Maestra, where Castro and his fellow rebels plotted revolution, offers fine hiking in forested hills in the east. You can see rural Cuba by bike and take in both coastal and mountainous scenery.

Nature, Zapata Peninsula

The best-known of Cuba's wildlife havens, the Zapata Peninsula, 156 km southeast of Havana, is a refuge for many bird and animal species. The scenery is spectacular: flamingos swoop across the milky lagoons, and crocodiles meander out across the dirt roads. The entire region is now a nature reserve.

Nature, Sierra Del Escambray

he majestic Sierra del Escambray is Cuba's second most famous mountain range after the Sierra Maestra in the Oriente, with its highest peak - the Pico San Juan - topping 1,100 metres. Some of the heaviest rainfall in Cuba feeds the Escambray's lush jungle, where trees are laden with bromeliads and delicate waterfalls greet you at every turn; look out for the giant umbrella-like ferns, a prehistoric species.

Sierra Maestra Mountains

To experience fully the rugged beauty of the southeastern mountains, the best base is the Villa Santo Domingo, in the hills south of the road linking Bayamo and Manzanillo on the coast. Guides accompany visitors to the area through the wilderness and lead hikes up Cuba's highest mountain, Pico Turquino (1,970 metres), 16 km away. The trail is exciting and beautiful: between outcroppings of mineral and volcanic rocks, deep green conifers stand alongside precious cedar, mahogany and trumpetwood trees.

Escambray Mountains

... or massif of Guamuhaya: mountain range that is characterized by steep peaks and deep valleys, the exuberance of vegetation, endemism of species of flora and fauna, cave systems, beautiful landscapes, pure and transparent rives and streams that make up picturesque waterfalss and crystalline ponds. The visit to this mountains also allow to know about the rural life associated to the growing of coffee and other agricultural activities.

What's a casa particular?

Casa particular (Spanish for "private house", casas particulares for plural) is a phrase meaning private accommodation or private homestays in Cuba, very similar to bed and breakfast although it can take the form of vacation rental. When the meaning is clear the term is often shortened to simply casa or casa particular that is basically a private family establishment that provides paid lodging, usually on a short-term basis. In general under this term you can find full apartments and houses, rooms inside people's homes, mini-apartments or rooms with separate entrance.

Why book a Casa Particular with us?

Our service is reliable and personal. Online reservations are not common in Cuba, that is why we guarantee a fast reply within 24 hours of your request. We have direct contact with our Casa Particular owners who will honor your reservation if it has been confirmed. You will never feel loss with our services; once you have reserved a room, we will give you all the information needed and will be ready to answer any questions.

How is our service?

Our service is free and legal, there are no online payments, no hidden fees. We have direct contact with the owners of the Casas Particulares we announce and assure they are all properly authorized by the Cuban government.

Casas particulares Cuba (Private homes)

Casas Particulares are a recent lodging option in Cuba. In some Casas the visitor will share common areas with the Cuban family, there are however many Casas in which the room is connected to the house but completely independent from the host family; in these cases you will enjoy the company of a Cuban family. There are other Casas in which the host does not live in the house and the space is private for the guest, these can be either houses or apartments. Casas particulares can be recognised by a small sign on the door, with two blue triangles (roofs) against a white background, which the owners obtain after paying a fixed per-room annual tax. Rooms are generally clean and upgraded to tourist standards. It ranges from basic accommodation of a room with a bed, a closet, a small table to full furnished independent apartments upgraded to western standards. Other features found may be a telephone, an alarm clock, TV, audio and video player and others. Food and drink may be supplied by a mini-bar (which often includes a small refrigerator) containing snacks and drinks (to be paid for on departure). It is also considered a type of boarding house typically operated out of a single family residence where guests can be accommodated at night in private bedrooms with private baths and where breakfast, sometimes continental and sometimes the full English variety, is served in the morning. The business may be operated either as a primary occupation or as a secondary source of income, and the staff often consists of the house's owners and members of their family who live there. In keeping with the similarity to B&B's, breakfast is usually included in the price, although one should ask first. Dinner is often also served, but not included in the price. However, if it becomes clear that one plans to generally eat out, the price may go up because this is an important second source of income. The owners will offer you extra services like laundry service, breakfast & meals...

Types of casas particulares rentals:

Private Room: A room, with a private bathroom. A key to the apartment-house is usually given to the guest. Private Room with independent entrance: Sometimes the house-apartment is split in order to allow this. Apartment: The privacy and independence of a full furnished apartment. Sometimes this apartment is part of a house, being split by a wall usually with a connecting door Studio-type or mini-apartment: Single bedroom-kitchen-living-dining room and bathroom. Sometimes this apartment is part of house being split by a wall usually with a connecting door. Villa-type or Independent House: An independent property with several rooms such as a bedroom, kitchen, dining room, living room, and bathroom. Some have other conveniences, such as a swimming pool.

Cuba has all the ingredients for a happy and pleasant stay, Cuba's history and nature, party and music, is rhythm and dance, is the most safe and peaceful destination in America and the world!! The pretty island of Cuba is in the northern Caribbean, just south of Florida. Cuba has flat rolling plains with some beautiful forest covered mountains along with pristine beaches. The rocky north coast has some of the best natural harbours in the world.! Home of the Salsa, Rumba and Cha Cha Cha, Cuba's musical tradition infiltrates every part of the island; across the fields and mountains and onto the Caribbean beaches and bars. Cuba plays host to many music events and festivals throughout the year including the Festival of the Caribbean, the Jazz Plaza and the Guitar Festival. Because Cuba is a multicultural society, there are many historic influences in the nightlife in Cuba is something special with plenty of live music pulsing in street corners and buildings. It is said that children in Cuba learn to dance before they can talk, but it is never too late for you to learn the moves and get the rhythm. Many of the resorts offer dance lessons and there is always the friendly local person to teach you. In most of our resorts, there is a selected on-site entertainment provided and you will also find recommendations of where to go and what to see elsewhere around the island. Cuba has a choice to suit everyone, from a glitzy Cabaret show to a Ballet performance or a baseball game in one of its stadiums for you to enjoy and make your stay a memorable one.

Cuba in the world

These are the benefits of choosing to stay at a Casa Particular over other types of lodgings:

Lower prices than at hotels with the same commodities.

It is the only way to get to know Cuba, its people and culture, and to make new friends.

It is a way to help Cuban families.

You could learn some Spanish, have fun dancing and enjoy the company of Cubans.

If you are looking for the most important intimate contact with our natural beauty, our beaches, our culture, our music, and during his visit to Cuba: our people, because then the best way to do it and be in direct contact with the Cubans, our hospitality, to know how to live, as we are, the way we face our problems with a smile, is living among us. This applies to those interested in renting accommodation sharing common areas with Cuban or separate from these families. Another great advantage is that you can save some money if you choose our private accommodations in private homes. The average is very cheap and we assure you that your visit will be different, entertaining and full of new experiences.

Planning your itinerary? We will help you discover the beaches you should visit on your trip to Cuba. We will show you our favorite options for scuba diving, relaxation and fun. Crystalline water, thin sand and warm weather are common points for every place on the list.

If the purpose of your trip is to visit the beaches in Cuba, planning is essential. You will find good accommodation, save money on transportation. It will be easy to move to other areas. To continue discovering the country's natural paradises. Make a budget and plan an itinerary based on the places you want to know. One of the aspects that worries more the tourists is the transportation. Because taking a taxi to the beaches and areas of interest is expensive. It is best to negotiate rates in advance or consider the option of paying for a rental vehicle to travel by road. There are no so many possibilities to go around to the most popular beaches from Havana. The only options are to travel on the tourist bus VíaAzul or the Astros line. Both are comfortable and prices range from 8 to 44 CUC (depending on destination). For accommodation a good option to save money in your trip to Cuba is to stay in a private house "casas particulares". That is important if you travel with your family. This gives you possibility to get to know the surroundings and relate to the locals. Also when you travel to Cuba with purpose to go to the beach you should check when are he dry and rainy seasons. Between May and October is the best climate (22-31 °C) to refresh you in the calm and crystalline waters.

Our main goal is to find a private houses in Cuba. Our service is reliable and personal. Online reservations are not common in Cuba, that is why we guarantee a fast reply within 24 hours of your request. We have direct contact with our Casa Particular owners who will honor your reservation if it has been confirmed. You will never feel loss with our services; once you have reserved a room, we will give you all the information needed and will be ready to answer any questions.

All casas shown are Legal Services registered as Cuban Taxpayer (Office ONAT) by pertinent Licences

Check theseal on the door or wall outside (Seal identify legal service) Seal Taxpayer

No online payments. The payment will be done once you arrive your destination, directly to the Casa Owners

The prices are per room per night

Max Adults per room depend of Casa rules

All prices and information given to you directly from Casa Owners

Most visitors to Cuba, wishing to escape the dark and long winters in their own countries, book into all-inclusive beach resorts promising sun, sea, and cheap mojitos, far away from where real Cuban life enfolds. At best, they may sign up for an escorted daytrip to Cuba's capital Havana, to stroll through the touristy and spruced up part of the historic center, and ride along the 8km (5-mile) long Malecón esplanade in a classic American car from the 50's.

There are, however, a growing number of travelers discovering there is much more to Cuba than beautiful beaches alone: picturesque colonial towns like Trinidad, Camaguey and Santiago de Cuba. The adventurous traveler can enjoy hiking, rock climbing, bird watching in National Parks and the Viñales Valley, white-water rafting, scuba diving or snorkeling, and not to forget, the intoxicating rhythms of Cuban music one can find on street corners, in dance clubs, or at other music venues. However, the biggest draw of all is undoubtedly the Cubans themselves, who are trying to play the limited cards they are dealt with an admirable resourcefulness, perseverance, and zest for life.

Traveling along Cuba's casas particulares is an ideal, affordable way to meet ordinary Cubans and get more insight into their daily lives. Privately owned single family residences, but strictly licensed and regulated by the government, the casas are the Cuban version of our bed and breakfasts and one of the few ways Cubans can make a couple of extra bucks to supplement their minimal incomes. Although simple, the rooms are clean and air-conditioned, have an annex private bathroom with shower. Often there is a fridge in the room as well. Best of all, you get this great sense of being part of their family, since the slogan "mi casa es su casa" invariably reigns. Once tapped into their network, you'll be free of accommodation and transport problems for the rest of your travel in Cuba: casa owners, happy to help you out, will simply refer you to family members, friends, or contacts of contacts all over the island.

Because of the complicated situation present in Cuba today, many Cubans feel the need to look for creative ways to earn money. One of these is to illicitly offer services to travellers such as accommodation, restaurants, and excursions. These people, commonly known as "jineteros" ("jockys" in English), are normally quite decent and friendly people, but unfortunately their persistence can become annoying. An image of tourists in Cuba at the Plaza de la RevolucionWhat complicates the situation even further is that these jineteros often aren't transparent about their business and disguise their motives, instead showing interest in becoming your friend. As a "friend" they can make money from you by finding you accommodation or restaurants and secretly taking commissions. As an independent traveller in Cuba it is very common to meet a Cuban in the street and become friends with them, later to find out that all they are interested in is your money. This is one of the most common complaints that independent foreign travellers have about their time in Cuba. While the services of a jinetero can be useful (in helping you to locate accommodation and a decent restaurant), and the they can be quite charming and entertaining characters, what frustrates independent travellers, is that their local friend becomes pushy and manipulative in their quest to earn more commission and that the whole relationship is based on dishonestly and deceit. Furthermore, towards the end of your stay, the jinetero often pleads with you for money to help them better their life, and frequently invents a story about a sick mother or a daughter's birthday as extra reasons for you to give them money. Refreshingly a majority of Cubans aren't in this game and feel extremely ashamed about their fellow compatriots that are. Like people everywhere, they would feel very uncomfortable about asking for money from somebody they have just met. Most Cubans are very honest and generous people who are delighted to meet a foreigner with no interest in their money at all. Unfortunately, as an independent traveller, these are the Cubans you are less likely to meet, as they are not the ones that come and introduce themselves to you on the street. A major advantage of being part of a small group tour in Cuba with a local guide, is that you will come into contact much more frequently with these honest Cubans and have less unpleasant interactions with people that try to take advantage of you. You will be introduced to families, artists, doctors, musicians, and dancers that the local tour leader knows well, and knows he can trust to treat his foreign guests with respect. When the jineteros see you with a local guide, they are much more reluctant to approach you because they know you probably have your accommodation and restaurants already organised and have someone to show you around. Furthermore, they may even know the guide and know that he will easily recognise them and disallow him to socialise with your group.
Habana

Havana is probably the most splendid example of Spanish colonial architecture in Latin America. Much of the historic centre has been carefully restored. The absence of the outward manifestations of international commerce - advertising billboards, burger chains, neon lights - helps create a subtle and haunting atmosphere missing in the other capitals of the Spanish colonial domain. Museums, forts and lively squares add to the attraction.

Viñales & Western Cuba

Comprising the new province of Artemisa and the most western province of Pinar del Río, western Cuba is a wonderfully rustic region of farms and forests, flanked by some beautiful and relatively underpopulated beaches. The only real city in the province, Pinar del Río, is of limited interest on its own, but it serves as a gateway to Viñales and the Vuelta Abajo, Cuba's premiere tobacco-growing and cigar-manufacturing region. Just north of Pinar del Río, Viñales is a pretty little hamlet in an even prettier valley, surrounded by stunning karst hill formations. Viñales is Cuba's prime ecotourist destination, with great opportunities for hiking, bird-watching, mountain biking, and cave exploration. On the far western tip of the island sits the tiny resort of María la Gorda, home to some of the best scuba diving in Cuba. Lying off the southern coast of this region in the Caribbean Sea are the island destinations of Isla de la Juventud, one of Cuba's top premiere scuba-diving destinations, and Cayo Largo del Sur, another long stretch of dazzling and isolated white sand.

Varadero & Matanzas Province

Matanzas is Cuba's second-largest province and home to its most important beach destination, Varadero. Boasting some 21km (13 miles) of nearly uninterrupted white-sand beach, Varadero is Cuba's quintessential sun-and-fun destination, with a host of luxurious all-inclusive resorts strung along the length of this narrow peninsula. In addition to Varadero, Matanzas province is home to the colonial-era cities of Matanzas and Cárdenas. In the southern section of the province is the Ciénaga de Zapata, a vast wetlands area of mangrove and swamp, renowned for its wildlife-viewing, bird-watching, and fishing opportunities. This is also where you'll find the Bahía de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs), where the nascent Cuban revolutionary state defeated an invasion force trained, supplied, and abetted by the United States. The beaches of Playa Girón and Playa Larga serve as a base for access to some of Cuba's best scuba diving. Playa Girón also possesses, arguably, the most stunning colorful waters in Cuba.

Trinidad & Central Cuba

Beginning with the provinces of Villa Clara and Cienfuegos, and including the neighboring province of Sancti Spíritus, central Cuba is the start of the country's rural heartland. Vast regions of sugar cane, tobacco, and cattle ranges spread out on either side of the Autopista Nacional, which more or less bisects this region as it heads east. Trinidad is perhaps Cuba's quintessential colonial-era city, with beautifully maintained and restored buildings set on winding cobblestone streets. The cities of Santa Clara, Cienfuegos, and Sancti Spíritus are considered lesser lights on the tourism circuit, but all have ample charms of their own. Santa Clara is a lively university town, and is considered the "City of Che Guevara," with its massive memorial to the fallen revolutionary leader. To the north of Santa Clara lie the tiny and utterly charming colonial city of Remedios and the beautiful beach resorts of la Cayería del Norte. Cienfuegos is a charming port town with the country's second-longest seaside promenade. Sancti Spíritus is one of the original seven villas of Cuba, with some wonderful old historic churches and buildings, and a more natural feel than you'll find in other more touristy towns.

Camagüey & Northeastern Cuba

This section of mainland Cuba is little more than a string of rural towns and small cities, anchored by two colonial-era cities. This is Cuba at its quietest, stuck in time and in no rush to break free. However, off the northern coast here lie a series of modern beach resorts built on long stretches of soft and silvery white sand, connected to the mainland by a long narrow causeway that seems to barely skirt the surface of the sea. The sister resort islands of Cayo Coco and Cayo Guillermo are two of the finest and most popular resort destinations in Cuba. Several less-developed beach resorts stretch east along the coast on the string of islands making up the Archipiélago de Camagüey, better known as the Jardines del Rey (King's Gardens). The cities of Ciego de Avila and Camagüey are seldom explored colonial-era cities. The latter, in particular, has loads of charms and attractions, and is being restored to highlight much of its former glory. North of Camagüey is the tiny but growing beach resort of Santa Lucía. It's best known for its excellent scuba diving, offering a chance to dive with bull sharks.

El Oriente

For most of the country's history, the whole eastern end of Cuba was known as El Oriente. Today, it is comprised of four separate provinces: Holguín, Granma, Santiago de Cuba, and Guantánamo. This is a large region with a host of gorgeous natural attractions, highlighted by the mountains of the Sierra Maestra -- a mecca for naturalists and adventure travelers as well as those looking to follow in the revolutionary footsteps of Fidel and Che -- and the very beautiful beaches of Guardalavaca, yet another of Cuba's premier beach resort destinations, with unimaginably fine white sand and calm turquoise waters. Of the cities here, only Santiago de Cuba is a tourist draw in its own right, although visitors to Holguín, Bayamo, or Baracoa will experience Cuba at its most authentic.

Santiago de Cuba

This is Cuba's second largest city. Set between the Sierra Maestra mountains and the sea, Santiago is a vibrant city with a rich artistic and cultural heritage. Santiago is considered the heart of Cuba's Afro-Cuban and Afro-Caribbean heritage, which is expressed in the music, dance, and religion you'll find here. Santiago's Carnival celebrations are by far the best in Cuba, and some of the best in the entire Caribbean. The city itself has a charming colonial-era center and a host of interesting museums and attractions, including José Martí's tomb and mausoleum, the original Bacardí rum factory, and the impressive Castillo del Morro protecting the city's harbor. Nearby sites worth visiting include the El Cobre shrine to the island's patron saint, La Virgin de Caridad, and the Gran Piedra, a massive rock outcropping allowing for great hiking and views.

Rent private houses

All the main destinations in Cuba, where you can find a particular house.

Main things to do in Cuba

Top rated attractions by places in Cuba.

Tours in Cuba

All tours that I have to offers you.

Main Destinations Cuba

Cuban Food, Music and Traditions

The Cuban celebrations are full of Caribbean flow. Music, dances and colors are characteristic of this land. They could be divided into two major groups: The official ones (linked to the dates of the revolution and their heroes). The national ones conformed by festivals, parrandas, carnivals and dances. These have a cultural and religious influence towards Catholicism and Santeria, both popular religions in Cuba. In each one they emphasize the own Cuban rhythms like the timba, rumba, drum yuka, trova, jazz, mambo and others adapted to its culture. Others are linked to the history and culture of the regions and to their gastronomy. In all there is a high involvement of the people, since these days are holidays for workers. Areas such as Santiago de Cuba, Cienfuegos, Havana, Guantanamo and Pinar del Rio have their own local festivals open to locals and tourists. If you want to enjoy them you have to plan your travel calendar according to your interests. For example, if you want to attend the carnival you must arrive in late June or early July when the first parades begin in Camagüey, Santiago de Cuba and Havana. Also in this month are the famous parrandas and festivals of Caribbean music. There are also traditions linked to the Cuban lifestyle. Such as baseball matches and playoffs, domino tournaments, community parades and more that are held throughout the year. The dates when there are more Cuban celebrations are January, June, July and December.

img 2017 Viñales

Viñales

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Parque Nacional Vinales is a beautiful, verdant valley in the Sierra de los Organos, north of Pinar del Rio. Steep limestone hills called mogotes slice through the valleys creating a dramatic landscape. The valley floors in the Parque Nacional Vinales are agricultural areas where tobacco, fruit, and vegetables are grown.

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Zapata Peninsule

A haven for birders and nature lovers, the Peninsula de Zapata is a remote, sparsely populated area of Cuba with diverse landscapes and one of the largest wetlands in the Caribbean. The Cienaga de Zapata, or the Zapata Swamp as it is affectionately known, is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, home to approximately 150 different species of birds, including rare bandicoots, waterhens, parrots, and heron.

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Trinidad

Exploring the town of Trinidad, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is like stepping back in time. The beautifully restored buildings and cobblestone streets in the city center imbue a quaint colonial feel. Much of the architecture dates from the 17th to the 19th century when Trinidad prospered from both the sugar and slave trades.

2017 Santiago de Cuba

Santiago de Cuba

Cuba's second largest city, Santiago de Cuba, is the most "Caribbean" of the island's cities, greatly influenced by immigration and trade from other Caribbean islands. It is proud of its revolutionary heroes, beautiful squares and vibrant musical tradition. And it is known particularly for its carnival.

Ciénaga de Zapata National Park

Being a most valuable natural reservoir that stands out nationally, regionally and worldwide, Ciénaga de Zapata National Park is the main core area of the Biosphere Reserve and the Ramsar site that have the same name. Natural and socio-economic characteristics of this territory make it be a priority area due to the ecological fragility of its ecosystems, its values for the conservation of biodiversity and other natural resources. It is an extensive ecosystem made up of mangrove forests, keys, seagrass beds, coral reef barriers and deep reefs, including the Cazones Gulf, a deep underwater canyon that is the main recruitment site of important commercial species such as porgies and groupers. The conservation status of coral reefs in the area is most remarkable. It comprises an important system of gyre-like currents.

This territory is characterized by both the presence of considerable peat depth and the fact that it is a low, flat area from the viewpoint of relief. Top height above sea level is only about 10 meters, while top depth in below-sea-level coastal zones is as follows: 2 meters in the salt-marsh area and from 1-600 meters in the sea coastal zone.

Climatic characteristics are very marked by local physical-geographical conditions. Annual average temperature is warmer inland, with a warm thermical regime almost all year long. In the warmest month, average temperature is 30° C and in the coldest one is 20° C. The warmest season begins in May and ends in October, while the coldest one (winter) stretches from November-April.

Rainfall has a marked seasonal behavior, with values oscillating from 1,200 and 1,300 mm during the rainy season and 250 and 300 mm during the dry season. The humidity regime is due to the air relative humidity - 85% -- and the predominating wind is that from the East. The overall relief is formed of marine surfaces conditioned by carbonated rocks and neotectonic evolution in the territory, with cumulative-biogenic coasts. Soils have an E - W spatial distribution in four strips: red and yellowish ferrous, peaty and loam soils - peaty, red and black rendsines, coastal swampy, and mangrove solonchak.

There is an extensive variety of ecosystems, mainly in zones where the saltwaterfreshwater inter-phase conditions predominate and in lowlands where salty lagoons, mangrove vegetation and elevated-karst zones with typical semideciduous vegetation forest combine. As to flora, there are outstanding species valuable as a genetic stock and different insectivorous plant species belonging to the genus Utricularia and Oxipalis. Likewise, remarkable to this area are the so-called "petenes", which have been recognized as a new plant complex for Cuba: the Plant Complex of Swamp Spring. There are diverse ecosystems, with plant formations such as: the semideciduous forest, the mangrove forest, the grama-grass savannah, grasslands and the swamp scrub, all of them being in an excellent conservation status. Mangrove forests stand for one of the largest and best preserved stretches in Cuba. This is an only-one-forest-canopy perennial-foliate forest where we can find the four mangrove species existing in Cuba: Rhizophora mangle (Red mangrove), Avicenia germinans (Black mangrove), Laguncularia racemosa (White buttonwood) and Conocarpus erecta (Buttonwood). These plant formations act as coastal-line protectors and contribute to soil formation. They provide important shelter to a great deal of animal species of which many breed here. It is one of the most productive ecosystems contributing with many nutrients used by highly-commercially valuable species that develop part of their life cycle in this habitat.

Around 900 autochthonous plant species have been reported; they have been grouped into 110 families, with 115 Cuban endemics, of which 5 are local endemics. From the fauna point of view, the largest wild populations of the Cuban crocodile (Cocodrilus rhombifer) and the American crocodile (C. acutus) stand out. Here too are important populations of the Conga hutia (C. pilorides) as well as birds such as the Cuban sandhill crane (Gnus canadensis nesiotes). Remarkable is the presence of three endemic birds threatened due to their scarce distribution: the Zapata rail (Cyanolimnas cervarai), the Zapata wren (Ferminia cerverai) and the Zapata sparrow (Torreornis inexpectata inexpectata). Species such as Amazona leucocephala (Parrot), Priotelus temnurus (Cuban trogon), Todus multicolor (Cuban tody), Mellisuga helenae (Bee hummingbird), Chlorostilbon ricordi (Cuban emerald) and Aratinga euops (Cuban parakeet) nestle in this Park. There are other birds such as: Butoegallus anthracinus (Common black hawk), Teretristis fernandinae (Yellow-headed warbler), Dendroica petechia (Yellow warbler), Starnoenas cyanocephala (Blue-headed quail-dove), Glaucidium siju (Cuban pygmy-owl). There is a local endemic reptile subspecies, Anolis lueteogularis calceus, in the Park forests. Other fauna species are frequently found: Epicrates angulipher (Cuban boa), Capromys pilorides and Mysateles prehensilis (hutias), Trichechus manatus manatus (Manatee).

Furthermore, there are over 175 bird species, with 18 of the 22 Cuban endemic birds, 3 of them being local. Over 65 migratory birds visit this site. Reptiles stand out too, with 31 species, and there are over 1,000 invertebrate species. Also, this zone is the only region in Cuba where the three Cuban genera of hutias (Capromys, Mesocapromys and Mysateles) co-exist. There are abundant concentrations of highly commercially valuable fish and crustaceans in their larva and juvenile status as well as other highly conservation-valuable species, thus constituting an important site for these species spawning, sheltering and feeding.

Playa Larga

Viñales

Vinales is considered one of the most important tourist destinations in the country, so much so that it has been stated in the travel section of the influential New York Times at number 10 among the top 52 destinations to visit in 2016. Vinales is one of the most beautiful natural environments in Cuba, embedded in "Sierra de los Organos" was declared a National Monument in 1979, was also approved in 1999 as National Park and in December of that year, it was declared by UNESCO World Heritage Humanity, in the category of Cultural Landscape. The area is ideal for nature tourism and adventure (hiking, caving and climbing) and mountaineering enthusiasts can find their challenges there as well. Viñales stands out more for the environment than their points of interest, since almost all activities carried out are outdoors. Vinales is a quiet and friendly people where travelers come to relax and enjoy the wonderful nature, relax and sit in the town square, where you can visit the House of Culture, the Art Gallery, the recently restored Church and Polo Montañés cultural center. To the west, a little separated from the center you can find Adela Azcuy the Municipal Museum, former home of a heroine of the independence wars where you can also book excursions. In the opposite direction (east) is the Garden of "Caridad" extensive garden adorned with plastic doll heads and full of flowers and plants.

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Habana

In Old Havana, a UNESCO world heritage site, the past is palpable. Rumba riffs roll through quaint cobbled squares; vintage cars ply the streets; and historic forts, museums, and beautifully restored architectural gems share the stories that shaped this grand city. For a sensory feast, Old Havana is best explored on foot. Meander along the narrow lanes, chat to the locals, climb the Spanish-built fortresses, feel the pulse of the music, and savor a coffee at one of the charming plazas where Cuban Baroque meets Art Nouveau.

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Playa Larga

Ciénaga de Zapata, considered a Biosphere Preserve and officially declared RAMSAR Site, is for sure one of the best places of the Island regarding beauty, biodiversity and historical values. Located to the southern coastline at Matanzas city,at 180 km to the south of Havana city,it is also the major humid area of the insular Caribbean, and a natural fragile ecosystems reservoir. With 4 520 km,it is the place of the Parque Nacional de Ciénaga de Zapata, accessible by road. Its inhabitant number is around nine thousand, with a density of barely six per Km2, the lowest in Cuba. Sea-freatic–tectonic caves area a special type of cave very abundant here, open all the long of a 70 km crack between the Bay of Pigs and Cienfuegos bay. In their surface there are semicircular lakes, which allow the access to flooded galleries, some of which serve as course for underground rivers. Another attraction is the Laguna del tesoro (treasure lake), with more than 4 m of average depth and almost 16 km of surface, which make it one of the major fresh water mirrors of the Island. According to an old legend, in the XIX century, when Spaniards went deep into that area, the first local inhabitants, being frightened, threw their riches to the water, which originated the name of the lake. Villa Guamá is also located here, and it is one of the most famous and visited of The Ciénaga de Zapata, due to its natural beauty and colorful architecture. There, several sculptures of Rita Longa recreate the daily activities practiced by the first local inhabitants. There is also a peculiar flora, found under the water, floating over it and by the shore. Among its fauna, we find biajacas, trouts, the cebrita cubana (Cuban zebra), the cabezota, as well as turtles and bullfrogs. Manjuari, a living fossil found in the access channels, and the manati, another traditional Cuban species, are an example of the local preservation tasks carried out. All of these reasons have turned this area into a place more and more known and preferred by ecology, sport and recreational fishing lovers. In the same way,in the Parque Nacional Ciénaga de Zapata, considered one of the most important Cuban birds hibernation centers, there are important natural areas. An example of this are the Salinas de Brito, a relevant preserve for aquatic birds like sevillas,herons, flamingos and cranes, and ideal for tourism of observation. On winter, more than 65 bird species coincide here, while in the Ciénaga de Zapata are 16 types of reptile, among them the Cuban cocrodile, which can be observed at the local breeding farm. A wide eco-tourist offer and an efficient specialized guide and equipments service are available for visitors to be in direct contact with nature.

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Cienfuegos

Located on the site of an ancient aboriginal town that due to the presence of an enormous, isolated, and well protected bay became an important center of piracy in the Caribbean, this city was founded in 1819 with the name of Villa de Fernandina de Jagua. Although in 1745 the Spanish colonial authorities had built a solid fortress in this place--which still exists, elegant and above all marine--this city shows interesting places of neoclassic inspiration as well as extraordinary monuments, like the Valle Palace, the Terry Theater, the Prado Promenade, and the Martí Park, among others. The historical central area of Cienfuegos has been declared a World Cultural Heritage Site by UNESCO’s Committee of World Patrimony, which considered it an exceptional architectural example of the modern ideas of order for city planning developed in The Americas of the 1800’s. The beautiful landscapes of the Escambray Mountains are near this city, while the province’s coast treasures rare and exotic beaches, such as Rancho Luna and the insular platform, with a spectacular seabed suitable for diving.

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Santa Clara

The city of Santa Clara is best known as the place where the dictator Batista surrendered to Che Guevara in 1958. The province of Villa Clara is also noted for its production of sugar, coffee and tobacco. A recently built causeway linking the mainland to the offshore islets has helped open the beach areas to tourism. In 1958, guerilla troops commanded by Ernesto Che Guevara attacked the industrial centre of Santa Clara after a hard, 400-kilometre march that had begun in the Sierra Maestra mountains. The dictatorship finally surrendered to Guevara’s troops. The province of Villa Clara is a traditional sugar producer. Excellent coffee grows on its southern mountain slopes, as does one of Cuba important tobacco crops. A recently built causeway linking the mainland to the keys has helped open the beaches to tourism.

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Trinidad

Nudging the emerald Escambray mountains, Trinidad is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of Cuba's most charming towns. So perfectly preserved are the quaint colonial buildings, the entire town feels as though it's trapped in a time warp from the 18th century. Stroll the winding cobbled streets here to discover a trove of architectural treasures, from colorful colonial mansions to historic churches and pastel-painted bell towers with panoramic views. Most of the buildings span the 17th to 19th centuries when the town prospered from the sugar and slave trades. Trinidad is also a great base for day trips to the mountains and the sea. From here, sightseers can hike to waterfalls in the Sierra del Escambray; bike to the pretty Playa Ancon, a palapa-studded beach; or venture into the Valle de Los Ingenios, yet another World Heritage-listed gem.

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Camaguey

A cradle of Cuban culture, Camaguey—the “City of Tinajones”—lies in the heart of cattle country and was laid out with irregular streets designed as a convoluted maze to thwart pirates. The historic centre is full of well-preserved colonial plazas and cobbled streets featuring antique churches and convents, and by colourful 17th- and 18th-century domestic buildings featuring red-tile roofs, lathe-turned wooden window grills, and spacious interior courtyards adorned with the city’s trademark oversized jars called tinajones. Camagüey is the third largest city in Cuba and a unique example of the colonial times in the country due to its maze-like street layout with many narrow and irregular streets, complicated junctions, and multiple squares. The best way to experience Camagüey is to get lost walking around the vast historical center without a pre-defined plan while admiring the interesting buildings of this colonial town, including many churches and colorful houses. Highlights include Plaza de los Trabajadores, Catedral de Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria on Parque Ignacio Agramonte, and Plaza San Juan de Dios.

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Santiago de Cuba

Santiago de Cuba is the second largest city in Cuba and a historical and cultural treasure. The city is often regarded as the root of the Cuban Revolution, and the many museums here retrace key events from this important period of Cuba's history. But unlike Trinidad, which seems frozen in time, Santiago de Cuba mixes modern architecture and industrial developments with its colorful colonial gems and historic fort. This bustling metropolis is also home to one of the country's most prominent universities, giving it a young and vibrant edge. Shaped by its rich mix of cultures and Afro-Caribbean heritage, the city is often said to be the most Caribbean city in the country. Today, travelers can experience this multi-cultural vibe in the eclectic music, diverse architecture, art galleries, and lively festivals. Day trips are also appealing from here. Not far from the city, tourists can visit a famous pilgrimage site, or hike to the top of a rocky summit for inspiring views across mist-shrouded peaks.

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Baracoa

Once upon a time, not all that long ago, it wouldn’t matter if a list of things to do in Baracoa was about the most tempting thing you’d ever heard of in your life, since it was practically impossible to get there. In the 1960s a road was built through the Sierra del Purial mountains that surround the town, connecting Baracoa with the rest of Cuba. Before this, much of Cuba didn’t make their way to the beauty of Baracoa except for the two or three weekly flights from Havana on Baracoa’s small regional airport on Russian-made airliners. Times might have changed (although not all that much in Cuba), and the town is still gloriously isolated. There are still just a handful of flights into the town each week, and that road through the mountains has not been expanded in any major way. And yet this is the appeal of Baracoa. You will be surprised that more visitors don’t actually make the effort to come to this part of Cuba, particularly those who love nature and also love to fill their stomachs. So what is it that makes this luminous town so special? Cuba’s oldest Spanish settlement, is slightly different than any other Cuban city. It’s a municipality of Guantánamo Province very close to the eastern tip of Cuba. Much higher amount of rainfall, makes it the region of lush, almost subtropical vegetation. After all, Baracoa is all about cocoa and coconut plantations and their products. Despite being hard to reach, it shouldn’t be missed in any Cuban trip, even if you only have one day time to spend in Baracoa. You can explore cocoa and coconut plantations, enjoy the taste of Baracoa cuisine, spend an afternoon at the beach and still have a plenty of time for learning some salsa moves at night.

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Cuba

"Esta es la tierra mas hermosa que ojos humanos han visto." [This is the most beautiful land that human eyes have ever seen.] - Christopher Columbus, upon arriving in Cuba, October 28, 1492.

Cuba is more than the largest island in the Antilles. It is an intricate archipelago comprising the main island (two-thirds the size of Florida), the Isle of Youth, and 4,195 keys [cayos] and islets. Their combined surface area is some 42,854 square miles. The country sits at the mouth of the Gulf of México, 87 miles from the Bahamas, 91 miles from Jamaica, 90 miles from Florida and 130 miles from Cancún.

Cuba has produced major international figures in literature and fine arts, film, ballet, modern dance and theatre. The country is also renowned for its original rhythms such as the danzón, son, bolero, mambo, cha cha chá and more. Cuba's prestigious cultural events attract international celebrities in dance, music, theatre and other arts. Among these events are the Casa de las Américas literary contest, the Havana International Ballet Festival, the Festival of New Latin American Cinema and the International Jazz Festival.

Why choose a Casa Particular in Cuba? Surely you're like most of those who visit us in Cuba are looking for a more intimate most importantly with our beautiful nature contact, our beaches, our culture, our music, and: our people. So the best way to be in direct contact with the Cubans, our hospitality, to know how to live, as we are, the way we face our problems with a smile, is living among us. This applies to those interested in renting accommodation sharing common areas with Cuban families. Another great advantage is that you can save some money if you choose our private accommodations in private homes. The average is very cheap and we assure you that your visit will be different, entertaining and full of new experiences.